A Town Like Paris

28 07 2009

“At the age of twenty-eight, Bryce Corbett was stuck in a dead-end job in London, nursing a broken heart and hungry for some kind- any kind- of change. On a whim he applied for a job in Paris, and before he knew it, found himself with a job offer in hand on his way to the City of Light.
So begins Corbett’s love affair with Paris- home of l’amour and la vie boheme- and he determines to make the city his own, no matter how many bottles of Bordeaux it takes. He rents an apartment in the trendy neighbourhood of Le Marais, happily settles into the French work/life balance (six weeks of paid vacation), braves the local gym (neon-spandex mandatory), and fumbles his way through more than a few awkward lessons in French love. From the smoky cafes to the glittering nightlife, Corbett samples everything his ewfound culture has to offer, apprearing in on a French television game show, hobnobbing with celebrities at Cannes, and attempting to parse the amusing nuances ehind French politics and why French women really don’t get fat. Still, he remains an ex-pat at heart – until he dinds himself falling in love with a Paris showgirl, a beauty whose sequin-clad high-kicks are the toast of the Champs Elysees, proving that in a town like Paris, you never know what will happen next…”


Mostly comedy, partly romance, and a great introduction to Paris, this book is hard to put down. Corbett takes us on his wild adventure about the city of Lights almost giving us hints of the how-to-become-a-Parisian during his journey and a few funny tidbits about one of the world’s most beloved city. He takes us to the backstreets, the underground, the secrets, the unkown, the experience of what it’s like to be an ex-pat in Paris, something that guidebooks just wouldn’t cut for you. This book is for lovers, ex-pats, and travel fans (though as my female friend have suggested, this literary is a guy’s book, once you read it you’ll know why) or just anyone who feels like they’re in the urge of doing something bold out of their ordinary lives to make it a little bit extra-ordinary.

That’s excactly what Bryce Corbett did.

Advertisements

Actions

Information

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




%d bloggers like this: